The Library of Congress
 American Memory icon

The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress
Manuscript Division, Library of Congress

The Frederick Douglass Papers collection has been migrated to an improved presentation and will no longer be updated in American Memory. Please visit the new presentation.


Search by Keyword | Browse by Series |  Search or browse Index of Names in Correspondence (PDF, 1.3 Mb)
The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress presents the papers of the nineteenth-century African-American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his own freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer, and publisher. The release of the Douglass Papers, from the Library of Congress's Manuscript Division, contains approximately 7,400 items (38,000 images) relating to Douglass' life as an escaped slave, abolitionist, editor, orator, and public servant. The papers span the years 1841 to 1964, with the bulk of the material from 1862 to 1895. The collection consists of correspondence, speeches and articles by Douglass and his contemporaries, a draft of his autobiography, financial and legal papers, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous items. These papers reveal Douglass' interest in diverse subjects such as politics, emancipation, racial prejudice, women's suffrage, and prison reform. Included is correspondence with many prominent civil rights reformers of his day, including Susan B. Anthony, William Lloyd Garrison, Gerrit Smith, Horace Greeley, and Russell Lant, and political leaders such as Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison. Scrapbooks document Douglass' role as minister to Haiti and the controversy surrounding his interracial second marriage. The online release of the Frederick Douglass Papers is made possible through the generous support of the Citigroup Foundation.
The mission of the Library of Congress is to make its resources available and useful to Congress and the American people and to sustain and preserve a universal collection of knowledge and creativity for future generations. The goal of the Library's National Digital Library Program is to offer broad public access to a wide range of historical and cultural documents as a contribution to education and lifelong learning.

The Library of Congress presents these documents as part of the record of the past. These primary historical documents reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. The Library of Congress does not endorse the views expressed in these collections, which may contain materials offensive to some readers.
Special Presentations:
Timeline
Douglass in His Own Words
Family Tree

Understanding the Collection

About the Collection

The Frederick Douglass Papers:
Provenance and Publication History

Finding Aid
from the Manuscript Division

Related Resources

Collection Connections

Working with the Collection

How to Order Reproductions

Building the Digital Collection

Copyright and Other Restrictions

Acknowledgments


American Memory | Search All Collections | Collection Finder | Teachers
Please Read Our
Legal Notices

Aug-25-2004